Monday, July 02, 2012

Tarmoh - Felix

Sports Illustrated's Tim Layden has another excellent story as he follows up on the Jeneba Tarmoh - Allyson Felix "dead heat" run-off

Thursday, June 28, 2012

The story of the photo-finish judge

Sports Illustrated's Tim Layden journals the interesting story of Roger Jennings, the man behind the photo finish review of the Allyson Felix-Jeneba Tarmoh dead heat. Although he played no role in USATF's decision on how to decide the dead heat, he is the man responsible for protesting his own decision (read the story for more).

Monday, June 25, 2012

Dead Heat

The 2012 USATF Olympic Trials are underway and although these events are always exciting to me, something happened this weekend which is quite unusual. Two women in the 100m race tied for third. [see here] There was some confusion about what to do with the race. Initially, Jeneba Tarmoh was declared the winner over Allyson Felix by 0.001s, a small margin by any account. The race was soon declared a "dead heat," and then not long thereafter Felix was declared the winner. But all evidence was inconclusive and the race was again ruled a "dead heat." USATF has now ruled that the 3rd place position (and final berth on the 2012 Olympic Team for this event) will be decided in a run-off later during the Olympic Trials (unless both racers prefer a coin-flip instead). The decision by these ladies, who are training partners, and the run-off (presumably they will select this option) should be exciting to watch, even if you aren't a Trackhead. For now, however, you'll have to be satisfied watching the 100m final again (linked below). NBC Olympics coverage of the USATF Olympic Trials 100m Final

Monday, June 11, 2012

Jonah Lehrer discusses creativity with Russ Roberts. Very interesting; Lehrer may be an author to add to my reading list (which is really a sitting on the shelf to be read later list).

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Innovation

..., or Creativity (I'm not sure which is which sometimes), can't be forced. We don't always know which ideas will stick, but if we take the shotgun approach (or the brute force approach) and try to make innovative or creative products we will fail (at least most of the time).

That's what I think Google's problem has been. Do you understand Google+ ? I certainly don't. It's not as intuitive as Facebook or Twitter and it doesn't seem to be working. Add it to the list of many failed Google ideas. I actually liked Wave--at least I thought the idea had merit even if the production was a loss--but not all "good ideas" pan out.

Apple has been successful for 10 years as a tremendously innovative producer. This was certainly attributable to Jobs but I think that the Apple culture is different too. Google's culture is more like Microsoft's and although Google will continue to be a large and successful company for many years, I'm pessimistic that we'll see much more innovation from them. Not that they won't try (nor and I suggesting that they should not try), but we may find their innovative products to be more surprise and less expectation.

Mark Cuban, however, is one who always seems to have simple, good, and creative ideas

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

It's been a long time

Since I've written anything here. Maybe I will start again. Writing is a skill that needs to be practiced and is (for most, probably) a useful therapy. For some, writing is a requirement for sanity. But those that must write, usually, are writers proper. I've once been a runner, which has its own obsessions, but the outlet provided by running can be substituted with other good things (for me: kids, reading). So, I'm not a writer (as in a must-writer), but I will try to write more.

My last post was on the NCAA T&F championships two years ago. Next year Texas A&M, a school for which I have a natural affection, joins the SEC (along with Missouri). This will be adventuresome in many regards, but excellent for Track & Field. Texas A&M and LSU are two of the best T&F programs in the nation and the rivalry should be well worth watching.

Back to writing: Twitter gets a bad rap, but I like it a lot. I think it has many implications in the news and reporting field (good, hopefully) but for the rest of us it's like a permanent writing assignment. Can I take my thoughts and publish them in useful, succinct, and (hopefully) beautiful presentations of 140 characters (or less)? And using standard grammar, of course. Twitter, when used appropriately, can be like jogging for the brain.

Monday, June 14, 2010

NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championships

Were on the television this weekend. The championships are actually 4 days of preliminary and final events, but Saturday's showing was a condensed bit of highlights the final day's events. It was exciting from start to finish. There were three dropped exchanges in the mens 4x100m relay (including favorite Texas A&M), the Oregon men finished a surprising 1-2-3 in the 1500m (it was a great pack and stretch run), and the Texas A&M 4x400m relay held off three attempts by Mississippi State to pass on the final curve to beat Florida by 2 to win the championship. If I find good videos of these events I will post them.